Planting Asparagus

Planting AsparagusAsparagus

Asparagus is planted in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked. The plant is grown from “crowns” (1-year-old plants).

  • Eliminate all weeds from the bed, digging it over and working in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost, manure or soil mix.
  • Dig trenches of about 6 inches wide and 6 to 12 inches deep.  Some experts believe shallow trenches of 6 inches are best.
  • Asparagus does not like to have its feet “wet,” so be sure your bed has good drainage. For that reason, raised beds can be a good place to plant asparagus.
  • Create a mound in the trench and plant the crowns 15 to 18 inches apart, spreading the roots over the ridge.
  • Cover the roots and crowns with soil 2 inches deep and water thoroughly.

As the stems grow, fill in the rest of the trench with soil, leaving 3 to 4 inches of the stem exposed

Care

 When the trench is filled, add a 4 to 8 inch layer of mulch and water regularly.

  • Do not harvest the spears in the first year, but cut down dead foliage in late fall and side-dress with compost.
  • During the second year, keep the bed thickly mulched, side-dress in spring and early fall, and cut down dead foliage in late fall.Harvest/Storage

 

  • Asparagus can take three growing seasons to harvest; you may be able to lightly harvest during the second year.
    • In the first year, just let the aspargus go vegetative to give the crown a chance to get well established. Next spring, remove the old fern growth from the previous year, and keep an eye open for the new spears to begin emerging.
    • For the following years, maintain the bed and harvest only the spears thicker than a pencil.
    • The asparagus can be harvested for a period of about two to three weeks once the spears start to show. Keep a close eye on your asparagus so that you don’t miss the harvest!
    • After harvest, allow the ferns to grow; this replenishes the nutrients for next year’s spear production.
    • Harvest for 2 or 3 weeks. After you harvest, leave the ferns so it can gather nourishment for next year’s growth.
    • Cut spears that are about 6 inches in length at an angle.
    • Asparagus freezes well.

 

Planting Strawberries

strawberry patch

  • Buy disease-resistant plants , of a variety recommended in your area.
  • Plan to plant as soon as the ground can be worked in the Spring.
  • Strawberries are sprawling plants. Seedlings will send out runners, or ‘daughter’ plants, which in turn will send out their own runners.
  • Make planting holes deep and wide enough to accommodate the entire root system without bending it. However, don’t plant too deep: The roots should be covered, but the crown should be right at the soil surface.
  • Provide adequate space for sprawling. Set plants out 20 inches apart, and leave 4 feet between rows.
  • Roots shouldn’t be longer than 8 inches when plants are set out. Trim them if necessary.
  • pH should be between 5.5 and 7. If necessary, amend your soil in advance.
  • Strawberries require 6-10 hours a day of direct sunlight, so choose your planting site accordingly.
  • Tolerant of different soil types, although prefer loam. Begin working in aged manure or compost a couple months before planting.
  • Planting site must be well-drained. Raised beds are a particularly good option for strawberries.
  • Practice crop rotation for the most success. Do not plant in a site that recently had strawberries, tomatoes, peppers, or eggplant.
  • Establish new plants each year to keep berry quality high each season.

 

Care

 

  • In the first year, pick off blossoms to discourage plants from fruiting. If not allowed to bear fruit, they will spend their food reserves on developing healthy roots. The yields will be much greater in the second year.
  • Eliminate daughter plants as needed. First and second generations produce higher yields. Try to space each plant about 10 inches apart.
  • Moisture is incredibly important due to shallow roots. Water adequately, about one inch per week. They need a lot of water when the runners and flowers are developing and again in the fall when the plants are mature.
  • Keep the beds mulched to reduce water needs and weed invasion.
  • Be diligent about weeding. Weed by hand, especially in the first months after planting.
  • When the growing season is over, mow or cut foliage down to one inch and mulch plants about 4 inches deep with straw, pine needles or other organic material. This can be done after the first couple of frosts, or when air temps reach 20 F.
  • Remove mulch in early spring, after danger of frost has passed.

Row covers are a good option for protecting blossoms and fruit from birds.

Harvest/Storage

Fruit is ready for harvesting 4–6 weeks after blossoming.

  • Harvest only fully red (ripe) berries, and pick every three days.
  • Cut by the stem; do not pull the berry.
  • Harvest will last up to 3 weeks. You should have an abundance of berries, depending on the variety.
  • Store unwashed berries in the refrigerator for 3–5 days.
  • Strawberries can be frozen whole for about 2 months.

 

Spring lawn reseeding

Lawn Seeding Tips

nice lawn

Even in well maintained lawns, spot or general lawn seeding is sometimes needed. Lawns can thin because of weather, a result of damage caused by insects, or grass diseases. Some badly damaged lawns need to be completely “rebuilt” before regular maintenance can do much good.

There are three general categories of seeding: spot seeding, lawn renovation and overseeding a lawn.. What type is right for growing grass on your lawn depends on the condition of your turf. At Salmon creek Nursery, Dave can help with all of your lawn seeding questions and needs.

Whatever type of seeding is done, there are three important rules to follow when seeding a lawn:

  1. High quality seed should always be used
  2. The seed has to make good contact with the soil
  3. Enough water has to be supplied to assure germination and establishment.

Reseeding will give it that thick carpet like look that all your neighbors will oooh and aaah over, and it’s pretty simple {and inexpensive}.  Spring reseeding is a walk in the park–a soon to be thickly carpeted walk in the park.

First, make sure you buy a seed that is high quality and compatible with the temperature.

Next, give the lawn a quick mow.  This will help remove any leaves and small sticks/twigs that could get in the way {it’s really best to do this a couple of days BEFORE you will be reseeding}.

On the day you plan to reseed, give the whole area a quick rake.  It will loosen the soil a bit and make it ready to receive the seed.  Using a drop spreader {you can also do it by hand, but you may not spread the seed as evenly}, cross the area you will be reseeding in a horizontal pattern, then repeat using a vertical pattern–that way, you make sure you covered the area evenly.  Then, LIGHTLY rake in the seed.  You can lay down a very, very thin layer of compost, soil, or peat moss over the top of the seed if you want {less than 1/4″}.  Water the seed in.  You don’t want to flood the place, so just give it a light watering.  You will want to keep the soil moist until the grass germinates and takes hold. Then, you can move to letting the soil dry out completely between watering and using a deeper watering plan.

That’s pretty much it.  Make sure you KEEP OFF of the grass while it is germinating.  You wouldn’t go walking on all the little seedlings in your garden, the same principal applies to new grass.  Also, resist mowing the new grass until it is at least 2″ long.Most important, Avoid any type of weed control until the new grass has been mowed 4 or 5 times.

Hopefully, when it is all said and done, the grass really will be greener on your side.

Applying Dormant Oil Spray

Gardeners are not the only ones who enjoy fruit trees. Pests — such as scales, aphids and mites — feast on the tender plant parts and overwinter on the fruit trees. Dormant oils control these annoying pests and are safe for use on fruit trees.Aphids scale on apple tree

Dormant oils once contained heavy oils that had to be applied when the fruit tree was in its dormant stage to prevent damage to buds and foliage. Nowadays newer dormant oils are lighter, allowing them to be applied at anytime during the year without harming buds. Because you can apply newer dormant oils throughout the season, the term “dormant” typically refers to the time at which the oil is applied. Dormant oil consists of refined petroleum oil that — when applied to trees — will smother overwintering insects — such as aphids, scales and mites — and their eggs or will dissolve their protective waxing coating. It is applied in the winter months when fruit trees are in their inactive period. For dormant oil to provide proper control, the oil must come in contact with the pests.

Dormant Oil Recipes

Several dormant oil recipes are available and help control pests on fruit trees. A dormant oil formula developed by scientists at Cornell University controls overwintering pests and foliar diseases. It contains 2 tablespoons of ultrafine canola oil and 1 tablespoon of baking soda mixed with a gallon of water. Cornell University scientists also developed a nourishing formula containing 2 tablespoons of horticultural oil, 1 tablespoon of baking soda, 1 tablespoon of kelp and 1 tablespoon of mild dish soap mixed with 1 gallon of water. Another dormant oil recipe contains 2 tablespoons of baking soda, 5 tablespoons of hydrogen peroxide, 2 tablespoons of castile soap — which is made from an olive oil base — and 1 gallon of water. If you are not one who likes to do DYI, you can buy it premade at the store.

Application

No matter which recipe you use, the application for the homemade dormant oil is the same. During the fruit tree’s dormant stage — which is typically between November and early spring before bud break — fill a pump sprayer with the homemade dormant spray and thoroughly coat the fruit trees — stems and both sides of the leaves — with the oil. Never apply dormant oil when the temperature is below freezing or when fruit trees are stressed. Stressed trees are more likely to become damaged when treated with dormant oil. Furthermore, only apply the oil spray when the fruit tree is dry. Moisture or high levels of humidity lower the effectiveness of dormant oil sprays.

Considerations

Dormant oils generally won’t harm beneficial insects since they are applied at a time when beneficial insects aren’t present on fruit trees and have a low toxicity level to humans and mammals. Furthermore, dormant oils won’t leave harsh residue behind. It loses its ability to control pests once dried, however, and can harm plants susceptible to oil sprays. Cedars, maples, spruce and junipers are a few susceptible tree species that dormant oil should not be used on.

Feed Yourself Feed a Friend!!!!

garden vegetable

Yes we are doing it again, The garden is planted and ready to grow!!!

Every Year at nursery we plant a large vegetable garden. Anyone who would like is invited to pick the vegetables that grow in the garden, we only ask that you leave an appropiate donation for the Brockport Food Shelf ,http://www.brockportfoodshelf.org/ in the jar that is located on the counter in the store.

We have been doing this garden for about 5 years now and we find that it is a great benefit for everyone.

If anyone is interested in volunteering to work in the garden we can always use the help.Just contact Grace at the Nursery 585 637 4497

asparagus plantsRight now we do have fresh asparagus available, Fresh cut every morning $3.00 per bunch. you’ll find it located on the counter at the store

General Perennial Garden Planting instructions

perennials2

1. Plant perennials as soon as possible after the ground defrosts. Choose a location where water drains quickly after a rainfall. Prepare your planting bed by loosening and turning under the soil to a depth of 8 in. Level the soil with a rake to remove large clumps of grass and large stones.

 

2. Amend your soil - add peat moss or compost and work in.

 

3. Dig the hole for each plant a little larger than the root ball. Set each plant with crown even with or slightly below the level of the surrounding soil. Fill in around roots with fine soil and firm lightly, leaving a slight depression or “saucer” around the plant to catch and hold water.

 

4. Water your perennials. Gently add about a quart of water to the “saucer” around each plant. Water again; let soak in. Fill in loose, fine soil around clump. Water again as needed. As a weed preventative you may want to mulch your garden and then put a light sprinkling of preemergent (preen) over the mulch.

5. Mulch in cold climates. After soil freezes solid in late fall, apply a mulch around perennial clumps. Use loose straw or evergreen branches that will not pack down tightly. Remove winter mulch in spring before growth begins.
BASIC SEASONAL CARE FOR PERENNIALS

 

1. Spring mulching. After perennial clumps begin growth in spring, add mulch to soil around plants. Do not cover crowns. Use grass clippings, shredded leaves, compost, wood chips, etc. Mulch keeps soil moist, roots cool; prevents weed growth and adds a layer of humus which will aid future growth.

 

2. Stake taller perennials to prevent damage by wind. Tie plants up as they grow.

 

3. Pruning. When perennials have finished blooming, remove dead flower heads and stalks, to prevent the plants from setting seed and to preserve their strength. Apply a slow-release fertilizer to keep foliage growing. This will assure healthy growth and good bloom the following year.

 

4. Fall trimming. Some perennial plants die back to the roots in fall; cut stems back to 3-4 in. above crowns. The clump will send up new growth in early spring.

5. Dividing and Multiplying. Most perennials may be divided after 2 or 3 years to provide a continual source of new plants. To keep plants healthy, they should be divided before they become over-crowded. After 3 or 4 years of growth, dig up the root masses in early fall or spring in our area. Cut the crown of each perennial into several sections with a sharp knife, with each piece retaining its own root system. If the center portion of the old plant shows heavy, woody growth, discard it and replant only the younger outer portions of the clump. Mulch perennials heavily to provide winter protection.